Stroke Risk Assessment

Stroke Risk Assessment

This stroke risk assessment tool will help you quantify your risk for for a stroke. Please remember that everyone is at risk for a stroke. This assessment tool will help you determine how great your risk is and what areas you could work at to reduce your risk.

Instructions:
There are eight categories with three to four answers in each category. Each answer has a numerical value. Please write down the numerical value that relates to your answer. Add up all the written numbers for a final risk score.

 

Category #1 — Blood Pressure
a) Your blood pressure is consistently under 120/80 1
b) Your blood pressure is consistently between 120/80 and 140/90 2
c) Your blood pressure is consistently over 140/90 4
d) You don’t know your blood pressure reading 3
Category #2 — Cholesterol
a) Your total cholesterol score is under 200 1
b) Your total cholesterol score is between 200 and 240 2
c) Your total cholesterol score is over 240 3
d) You don’t know your cholesterol score 3
Category #3 — Diabetes
a) You are not diabetic 1
b) You are a borderline diabetic 2
c) You have diabetes 3
d) You don’t know what your blood sugar level is 3
Category #4 — Smoking
a) You are a non-smoker 1
b) You are trying to quit smoking 2
c) You still smoke 3
Category #5—Atrial Fibrillation
a) Your heartbeat is always regular 1
b) Your heartbeat occasionally skips a beat or you don’t know 2
c) You definitely have an irregular heartbeat 3
Category #6 — Weight
a) Your weight is in the normal range for your height 1
b) You are slightly overweight by at least 10-30 pounds 2
c) You are overweight by more than 30 pounds 3
Category #7 — Exercise
a) You exercise on a regular basis at least 3x per week 1
b) You exercise occasionally 2
c) You don’t exercise at all 3
Category #8 – Family History
a) No one in your family has ever had a stroke 1
b) You’re not sure if anyone has ever had a stroke 2
c) At least one family member has had a stroke 3
Final Score: Add up the circled or written numbers to determine your total risk score.
Low Risk: 8-11The lowest possible is 8, since everyone has some level of risk for a stroke. If you scored a 3 for not knowing your blood pressure reading, cholesterol score or blood sugar level, then please be proactive and see a qualified physician to determine these important risk factors.
Moderate Risk: 12-15 You have a higher probability of a stroke and need to take action to reduce this score. If you scored a 3 for not knowing your blood pressure reading, cholesterol score or blood sugar level, then please be proactive and see a qualified physician to determine these important risk factors. Of the 8 categories, only family history is uncontrollable. Pick one of the other 7 categories and begin to take positive steps to bring it down to a 1. Once you’ve accomplished this, then maintain this level as you tackle another lifestyle risk to bring that under control.
Elevated Risk: 16-19 If you’re not seeing a qualified physician, then it is time to do so. Work with your physician to put together a comprehensive plan of action that will address reducing your risks. Especially concentrate on high blood pressure if you scored a 2 or more, since this is the No. 1 risk factor for a stroke.
High Risk: 20-24 According to the National Stroke Association, “Eighty percent of strokes are preventable.” It is time for you to take action and see a qualified physician to put together a comprehensive plan of action that will address reducing your risk for a stroke. Do not put this off any longer.

 

 

 

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