Stroke Assessment

Everyone is at risk for a stroke.

This assessment tool will help you determine how great your risk is and what you can do to reduce it. This assessment will take approximately 5 minutes.

Instructions:

There are eight categories with three to four answers in each category. Click on the box that relates to your answer, then click the submit button to see the next question.

Continue

Results

Low Risk

You are at the lowest risk for a stroke. If you are unsure of your blood pressure reading, cholesterol score or blood sugar level, be proactive and see a qualified physician to determine these important risk factors.

Moderate Risk

You have a higher probability of having a stroke and need to take action to reduce this score. If you are unsure of your blood pressure reading, cholesterol score or blood sugar level, be proactive and see a qualified physician to determine these important risk factors
Of the eight categories, only family history is uncontrollable. Pick one of the other seven categories and begin to take positive steps to lower your score. Once you've accomplished lowering the score for one category maintain this level as you tackle another lifestyle change on the list.

Elevated Risk

If you are not seeing a qualified physician, then it is time to do so. Work with your physician to put together a comprehensive plan of action that will address reducing your risks. Especially concentrate on high blood pressure if you scored a two or more, since this is the number one risk factor for a stroke.

High Risk

According to the National Stroke Association, "eighty percent of strokes are preventable." It is time for you to take action and see a qualified physician to put together a comprehensive plan of action that will address reducing your risk for a stroke. Do not put this off any longer.

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